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having -- leading the sec. your calls, comments, and tweets on the announcement from the pentagon yesterday. 202 is the area code. give us a call -- join us on facebook at facebook.com/c-span2. let's begin with a look at one of the headlines this morning from "the new york times," a profile of a photographer in iraq. let me share with you a paragraph or two from "the new york times." -- we will share with you some more from the announcement yesterday at the pentagon. first, some of your calls. wilson joins us from little rock, arkansas. caller: even the women, even though they are just as brave in their bravery, there is no doubt about their bravery. the physical ability and stamina -- i am an ex-. tripper from the military -- ex- paratrooper from the military. training for women has gotten easier capri -- easier. women can be distracting for men as well. host: the orders to end combat exclusion, seeing that it will level the playing field in careers. brian on the republican line from wisconsin. welcome to the program. caller: glad i got a hold of you. first time on the program. i
the outgoing pentagon chief set to lift the two decades' old ban on women serving on the front lines. plus, after months of delays, secretary clinton testifies on bernanke. -- benghazi. >> we had no doubt there were terrorists militants they killed our people. >> we were mislead there were supposedly protests and something sprang out of that, an assault sprang out of that. >> with all due respect, the fact is we had four dead americans. was it because of a protest or guys out for a walk one night who decided they would go kill some americans. what the difference at this point does it make? >> shepard: secretary clintons testifying for the first time about the attack in libya. and facing fierce criticism. >> i'm glad that you're accepting responsibility. i think that ultimately with your leaving you accept the culpability for the worse tragedy since 9/11. i really mean that. >> shepard: tonight, her responses, the emotional moments. >> i put my arms around the mothers and fathers, the sisters and brothers and sons and daughters. >> shepard: and what we still do not know about the attack in
. it would be interesting if there was. i don't think woe learned a lot about that or why the pentagon was so ill prepared, had no forces in region on the anniversary of 9/11. but, you know, i think it was largely a political exercise for republicans trying-- they know who she is, and what her broader aspirations are likely to be. and they tried to rebuke her, and i think she handled herds pretty deftly under the circumstances. and she, for example, defended susan rice while at the same time suddenly distancing herself from ambassador rice's comment. >> rose: basically saying we don't know. is that what she said? >> well what, she said was ambassador rice shouldn't be faulted for saying the attack was sort of stemmed from a protest in front of compound, but then she pointed out she, secretary which the, had not in fact made such assertions and from the beginning blamed it on militants. i think her statement was pretty carefully prepared. and, again, she starts off by take responsibility and saying she's implementing all of the recommendations but she makes clear she didn't see the numerous ca
states -- the pentagon lifts its ban on women in front line and combat roles. >> on the chopping block, germany's second-largest bank plans to fire up to 10% of its work force. the european union is at a crossroads, and the british prime minister, david cameron, says if the blockheads towards the centralized political union, then it is not for him and not for britain. >> german chancellor angela merkel has chosen her words very carefully, responding at the world economic forum in davos by voicing conditional optimism as far as europe's future goes. she says that patience is needed for structural reforms to take effect. >> she has also called for more regulation of the finance industry to avoid more turbulence, a point of contention with britain. both agree that competitiveness is the key, but how to go about that is the big question. >> david cameron brought his message with him to the swiss alps. in his address to the world leaders in doubles, he repeated his demands for big changes to the u.s. and britain's relationship to it -- in his address to world leaders in davos. >> i'm not ju
america." for the first time, the pentagon allows american women to serve in combat roles. britain, germany, and the netherlands are to their citizens to get out of benghazi, libya in response to an imminent threat against westerners. >> just touched a button. it hands you the picture. >> it brought us a new age of instant photography. tonight, we focus on the man whose polaroids help capture our lives in real time. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. it is time for policy to catch up with reality. that was the message that leon panetta said today as he lifted a ban on women serving in combat. acknowledge in the sacrifices which have already been made by both sexes, he talked of a future where everyone would be given the opportunity to serve in front line rolls. what's the next greatest generation will be one of men and women who will fight and die together to protect this nation. that is what freedom is all about. >> leon panetta there. what do these changes mean and how does the u.s. military compare with other countries like britain? our
on the clinton testimony. in other news, huge change tonight in the pentagon's policy toward women in combat. on his way out the door, defense secretary leon panetta is opening the door to put women on the front lines. national security correspondent jennifer griffin reports from the pentagon tonight. >> secretary panetta plans to lift the military's ban on women serving in combat, opening thousands of front line combat to women. the ban had been in place since 1994. the service chiefs have until january 2016 to seek exceptions to certain units. the new directive will open more than 230,000 jobs for women in the army and marines. defense officials say the announcement will be made tomorrow. chairman of the armed services committee, senator carl levin welcomed the decision. "i support it. it reflects the reality of 21st century military operations." but recent studies found women are neither as strong as men in front line positions and socially they may disrupt the all-male units. elaine donnelly of the center for military readiness warns secretary panetta's decision threatens the tip of the
. >> do we know how quickly this will happen? >> the pentagon says they want to have an implementation process and get it done by 2016. there is still a big outclause on all of this. the services, military units could say at the end of the day they want an exemption and they don't think they can have women in the units. you hear the same issues, personal hygiene, can women pass the physical requirements, all of this still on the table. so panetta knows and chuck hagel was supporting him. they know they have to do this somewhat gradually. >> thank you. appreciate it. >>> this guy, diplomatic trouble shooter, decorated war veteran john kerry on top to be america's top diplomat. the senate foreign relations committee is holding a hearing on the nomination to become secretary of state. kerry talked about how his military experience in vietnam has shaped his views. >> i want all of us to keep in our minds as i think we do the extraordinary men and women in uniform who are on the front lines even as we meet here today. the troops at war who helped protect america i can pledge to you that as
and delayed them by 90 minutes according to pentagon officials. then there is the decision by secretary of state clinton and state department under-secretary of management patrick kennedy who was in the operation center that night. not to send a foreign emergency support team, which the state department own web site describes as the government only interagency on-call short notice team poised to respond to terrorists ips dents. as a result, the f.b.i. could not enter the complex for 24 days after which point most evidence was gone. secretary clinton will be asked why more security wasn't provided at the benghazi mission after the june 6 bombing and why ambassador chris stevens left behind some of his security detail in tripoli. why the reck secrecy? >> bret: we'll cover it tomorrow. thank you. the pentagon says the al-qaeda affiliate in north africa is at the top of the list for suspects for algerian terrorist attack. three americans were killed. seven others escaped. the overall death toll there believed to be around 80. the task of identifying some of the bodies continues. algerian go
comfortably that the decision that the pentagon made is a very good one. and i just like to sort of pick up on elaine's point about the role of the infantry. she is right in saying that aspects of the infantry is indeed to hunt and kill the enemy. but i would also say that 21st century warfare has changed. 21st century warfare in recent experience? iraq and afghanistan is about winning hearts and minds, and a big role of the infantry now is about working with the locals and the locals are not just men, they are women and little girls. and i think the dynamic that a woman brings to a unit that is out in these roles, working with the local population is absolutely key and vital. >> okay, okay. >> that's what the women are doing right now. that is what they are doing and we are proud of them. >> elaine, i want to know, how you answer -- >> i want to agree with that. >> i want to know how you answer women who feel able to fight along their male counter parts and i want it after the break. >> okay. well, there is. [ male announcer ] it's called ocuvite. a vitamin totally dedicated to your eyes,
that or why the pentagon was so ill prepared, had no forces in region on the anniversary of 9/11. but, you know, i think it was largely a political exercise for republicans trying-- they know who she is and what her broader aspirations are likely to be. and they tried to rebuke her, and i think she handled herds pretty deftly under the circumstances. and she, for example, defended susan rice while at the same time suddenly distancing herself from ambassador rice's comment. >> rose: basically saying we don't know. is that what she said? >> well what, she said was ambassador rice shouldn't be faulted for saying the attack was sort of stemmed from a protest in front of compound but then she pointed out she secretary which the had not in fact made such assertions and from the beginning blamed it on militants. i think her statement was pretty carefully prepared. and, again, she starts off by take responsibility and saying she's implementing all of the recommendations but she makes clear she didn't see the numerous cables that came in. that was the point of predict with the lawmakers. they wante
top level white house jobs to women. we are also looking at how the pentagon is planning to respond to north korea's new round of threats including nuclear tests and the vice president's sneaky strategy to try to pressure gun owners to support the administrations. pushing for new gun control laws. you are in "the situation room." . >>> we begin with the reshuffling at the white house. a few hours ago, president obama announced he is moving the deputy security adviser do into the position of white house chief of staff. today's big news as the president's clear response to complaints that women were not getting enough top level jobs. the white house correspondent has the latest information. jessica? update us on what's going on. it's a sensitive subject. >> it is. in choosing dennis mcdonough he chose comfort, friendship and trust over political pressure and the chance to make history that would have come for naming the first female chief of staff to the post. dennis donough is a long time trusted aid. here's what the president said when he announced the choice. >> i have been countin
is no longer on hold. that's after the pentagon inspector general cleared allen of any wrongdoing in e-mail exchanges with a tampa, florida woman. allen steps down as overall coalition commander in afghanistan next month. the air force's top general vowed today to put an end to sexual misconduct within the service. figures for 2012 show some 800 reported incidents. many of the cases stemmed from a scandal at lackland air force base near san antonio. an investigation there found 32 instructors allegedly engaged in sexual misconduct with nearly 60 female service members. at a house hearing, the air force chief of staff general mark welsh called the numbers appalling. >> there is no way we can allow this to happen again. the air force goal for sexual assault is not simply to lower the number. the goal is zero. it's the only acceptable objective. the impact on every victim, their family, their friends, the other people in their unit is heartwrenching. and attacking this cancer is a full-time job and we are giving it our full attention. so far, six training instructors from lackland have be
up plans for putting women on the front lines. the process was set in motion today at the pentagon. >> not everyone is going to be able to be a combat soldier. but everyone is entitled to a chance. >> brown: with that, defense secretary leon panetta-- joined by the chair of the joint chiefs of staff, general martin dempsey-- announced he's ending a 1994 ban on women in combat roles. >> as secretary, when i've gone to bethesda to visit wounded warriors, when i've gone to arlington to bury our dead, there is no distinction that's made between the sacrifices of man and women in uniform. they serve, they're wounded and they die right next to each other. the time has come to recognize that reality. >> brown: nearly 300,000 women have deployed over the past 11 years in iraq and afghanistan, where the frontlines aren't so clearly drawn. and 152 have died there. today's decision opens up some 230,000 battlefront positions to women, many in army and marine infantry units. commanders will have to decide whether women will be eligible for elite forces, such as the navy seals and the army's d
to a woman in florida. the pentagon was investigating investigations and that general john allens' three occasions with jill kelly were inappropriate. petraeus later resigned. isico's supreme court expected to rule on a case that triggered a diplomatic dispute with france a french national is serving a 60-year jail sentence for kidnapping and organized crime. adam reports from mexico city. >> this police raid forage was so convincing that the mexican public and judges were sure that the french woman was a criminal. the only problem was that the video was staged the day after she was actually arrested. later, it emerged that the federal police chief at the time staged a raid from the country's two top tv networks. she is currently serving a 60- year jail sentence for kidnapping and organized crime. but on wednesday, mexico's supreme court could rule whether her constitutional rights were violated. the kidnapping victims were found at the ranch where she was staying with her boyfriend. he confessed to the kidnapping, but said she had nothing to do with it. she has always maintained her inn
of defense has no changes planned. >> for more on the pentagon's announcement, i spoke a short time ago to a former army sergeant who served in deployment in iraq. thank you very much for coming in. let me pick up on what the lieutenant general was saying. he says it is not sexist but it would be lowering standards to put women on the front line. >> the military is not lowering standards. women have been serving in combat for a decade now. and one of the other issues that the military struggle is with -- struggles with is that only 25% of people qualify for military service. unfortunately, 75% are to physically unfit, not educated enough, or have criminal backgrounds. if we want to get the best in military service, we need to make sure that women are part of the population. >> you have to open the door for everybody. they would have to meet physical fitness standards. they're not actually lowering standards. few served in iraq. >> i did. >> you were shot at. >> we took small arms fire and direct fire. that is true. >> you were in a combat position? >> that's right, i went on patrol with
at operating in combat and killing the enemy. jennifer griffin live at the pentagon with the news. why did military leaders say this had to happen now? >> essentially because women are already in combat. chairman of the joint chiefs, martin dempsey said he realized when he got into his armored vehicle in baghdad in 2003. >> and i slapped a gunner on the wagon and she leaned down and said, i'm amanda, okay, so a female turret gunner protecting the commander and times have changed and something to do about it. and life as we know, there are no guarantees of success. not everyone is going to be able to be a combat soldier. but everyone is entitled to a chance. >> reporter: secretary panetta said that his eyes were opened when he was over at the cia and realized half of the intelligence force over there were women and he talked to the joint chiefs when he came over here to serve as defense secretary about what changes could be made, shep. >> shepard: jen, what are we hearing from women in the military? >> most have accepted this and are excited about it. what they've explained to us, this wil
: brit, thank you. >> you bet. >> bret: just who gets to take part in future wars is changing. pentagon today formally announced the intention to allow a new group of fighters on the front lines. national security correspondent jennifer griffin tonight on women in combat. >> with the stroke of a pen, secretary panetta and chairman of joints chief ended a ban on women in combat. general dempsey said he realized women were already on the front lines when he got his armored vehicle in baghdad in 2003. >> i slappe slapped the terret n around the area and said who are you? she said i'm amanda. from that point on i realized something had changed and it was time to do something about it. >> panetta smoke of opportunity -- spoke of opportunity. >> in life, as we know, there are no guarantees of success. not everyone is going to be able to be a combat soldier. but everyone is entitled to a chance. >> marine such as ryan smith, retired sergeant who served in iraq thinks the decision puts lives at risk. >> my first sargent was mortally wounded in iraq and he was the tourett of am fibbous assault v
there was no distinct central africa command in terms of the way the pentagon cleaved the world. in 2007 there was africa command and it currently is stationed in europe, not actually in africa. there have been a variety of initiatives to train the soldiers of different african regimes, counterterrorism training, other kinds of training and in fact the soldiers of mali. mali was one of the star pupils in the -- >> and they're the same people now we're fighting. >> right. so i want to turn to mali in a second but first i want to push back -- not push back but to play devil's advocate about this intervention question on libya. when you look at all the negative consequences of libya, what do you say to the point about syria? everything that you could say about libya, weapons, destabilization, refugees, everything that's terrible about what has been the fallout of libya seems to me happening in syria as well where there hasn't been the same intervention and so maybe it's just the nature of the conflict as opposed to what the u.s. or the west does. >> no, that's a copout. it's not the nature
. >>> plus, a history making change at the pentagon. [ female announcer ] what if the next big thing, isn't a thing at all? it's lots of things. all waking up. connecting to the global phenomenon we call the internet of everything. ♪ it's going to be amazing. and exciting. and maybe, most remarkably, not that far away. we're going to wake the world up. and watch, with eyes wide, as it gets to work. cisco. tomorrow starts here. so i used my citi thankyou card to pick up some accessories. a new belt. some nylons. and what girl wouldn't need new shoes? and with all the points i've been earning, i was able to get us a flight to our favorite climbing spot even on a holiday weekend. ♪ things are definitely looking up. [ male announcer ] with no blackout dates, you can use your citi thankyou points to travel whenever you want. visit citi.com/thankyoucards to apply. >>> you're in "the situation room." happening now, the pentagon clears the way for women to serve in combat. critics question whether they can handle all of the physically demanding jobs on the front lines. vowing to carry out a n
transport planes have joined the french effort to repel islamist rebels in mali. pentagon spokesman george little confirmed today that u.s. c-17's have flown five missions to the african nation in recent days. they ferried more than 80 french troops and 120 tons of equipment. little said the u.s. is still considering whether to provide aerial refueling planes. at least 17 iraqis died in a series of car bombings in and around baghdad today. dozens more were injured. one blast targeted a crowded market in the shiite neighborhood of shula, where the burnt-out shells of cars and other charred debris littered the streets. there was no immediate claim of responsibility. the u.n. secretary-general has offered a grim appraisal of the situation in syria, essentially saying there's little hope for any diplomatic solution. ban ki-moon spoke today during his first news conference of the year at the u.n. in new york. >> we are still a long way from getting the syrians together. the key decisions about the country's future are in the hands of the syrians. but the international community and in particula
the jobs of all 46,000 temporary civilian employees at the pentagon. the announcement today said it's a response to mandatory, across- the-board spending cuts. they're scheduled to take effect march 1, unless congress comes up with alternative cuts. without changes, hundreds of thousands of full-time civilian employees will face furloughs and reduced paychecks by april. the government of syria called today for thousands of refugees to come home, including those opposed to the regime. nearly 600,000 syrians have fled the civil war and gone to neighboring countries. there's been a new surge this week. we have a report narrated by alex thomson of independent television news. >> the children say they double-checked their figures. they counted around 10,000 children in the overcrowded camps in jordan in just the past 24 hours, with the parents or gardens they recognized around 20,000 people in all. with the winter cold and conditions like this, in the camps, king abdullah of jordan took the might of these people to the top today, to the world economic summit in davous. >> jordan is hosti
pentagon official. in july 2001 he assumed the duties of military assistant to secretary rumsfeld and work daily with the secretary for the next five and a half years. upon retirement from the army continued at the pentagon as deputy assistant secretary of defense homeland defense and american security affairs. please join me in welcoming steve. [applause] >> let me add my welcome to all of you. i think we're going to have a real treat this morning. as john mentioned, i am a special forces officer by profession. so this area is near and dear to my heart. this is kind of what we do or did. it'll let me do it anymore. [laughter] i mentioned to max when he came in a little historical artifact in that when i was a cadet at west point i bought a book that had just been published. a two volume set. it was called war in the shadows , the guerrilla in history by robert aspirate. that book from 1975 until now really has been the sort of a benchmark for this kind of historical review of this subject area. that is a long time for a book tour keep that sort of position. well, with apologies, i think h
of the questions have come out of pentagon and have been answered about why it took so long. >> actually not satisfactory. how on september 11th, of all days, with all these warnings didn't we have assets there for seven hours to -- there's so many questions that -- >> so this is not over in your mind at all, not over. >> what did the president do during this period of time? there's two movies been made about getting bin laden with every ticktock of heavy minute. we still don't know what the president was doing, but more importantly, martha, more importantly than that, very quickly, is what's happening all over north africa? what's happening in the middle east? things are deteriorating in a rapid fashion, and it's because of a lack of american leadership. >> deteriorating certainly in north africa. a lot of presence of al qaeda. >> iraq, syria. >> let's go to syria and talk about syria. i actually spoke to secretary of defense leon panetta last week about syria, and he had some pretty alarming things to say. he basically said those shells that the u.s. knew they were loading, artillery s
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 88 (some duplicates have been removed)